1234 - Agility and Coordination Exercise


Here's another interesting agility and coordination exercise for you called “1234.”

Before we get to that, though, I wanted to talk a little about why we even do exercises for agility and coordination.


Why We Do Agility and Coordination Exercises

Most of the time, all your feet have to do is walk forward or stand in place, which is fairly simple. However, once in a while you may run into a situation that requires your feet to move in a manner that is very different from normal standing and walking.


Here are a few examples of those situations:

  • You trip on something.
  • Someone bumps into you.
  • You have to step over a pothole or puddle.
  • You have to get out of the way of something quickly.
  • You step on something slippery.

The question is, when those things happen, will your brain know where to put your feet? And if your brain does know where it wants to put your feet, will your feet actually do what the brain wants them to?

To recover from these things without falling, your feet may need to move sideways or diagonally, or you may need to take bigger or smaller step than usual, or you may need to take two steps in a row with the same foot (which is unnatural since we are used to alternating feet as we walk).

The normal movement we get in our daily lives doesn’t prepare us for any of this, because most of our movement is forward, and our steps are generally always the same comfortable length.

The reason we do agility and coordination exercises is to train your brain and legs to move in many different ways, so that you are coordinated and agile and can react however you need to in order to avoid a fall.

Now that you know why we do these exercises, let’s get on to the video:


(turn your sound on)

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This Exercise is from the
Agility and Coordination Exercises book


Explanation

Step forward and to the right with your right foot, and follow with the left. Then take another step in the same direction with your right foot and follow with the left. Now move diagonally to the left with the left foot first. Left foot, right foot, left foot, right foot.

This is called “1234” because you take 1-2-3-4 steps diagonally to the right, and then you switch directions and go 1-2-3-4 steps diagonally to the left.


To Make It Harder

Clap on Steps 1 and 3

As you to the 1234 pattern, clap your hands when your foot touches the ground for steps 1 and 3. This a little bit harder now because we are making the brain coordinate both the legs and the arms, but clapping on 1 and 3 is a natural rhythm so it may be easier for those of you who have are musically inclined.

Clap on Steps 1 and 4

This time you will clap when your foot touches the ground for steps 1 and 4. As you will notice, step 1 takes place immediately after step 4, so you have to clap two steps in a row and then wait for two steps. This is a lot harder, and I even screw it up from time to time when demonstrating it to my students.

Watch the video again and then give this exercise a try.

Learn the Complete System of
14 Agility and Coordination Exercises


Agility and Coordination Exercises
  • 14 exercises that work on agility and coordination.
  • Includes diagrams and videos of every exercise.
  • Download instantly after ordering and get started right away.
  • No equipment needed.
  • Takes about 10-15 minutes to do.










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